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Young Auto Care Network Group

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Home for the auto care industry’s dynamic and vibrant community of under-40 professionals

YANG provides its members with the opportunity to network with industry peers, develop new skill sets and improve leadership capabilities.

YANG events include panel discussions with industry leaders, professional development sessions and networking events throughout the country. YANG awards a number of scholarships to rising stars in the industry as well.

YANG provides its members with the opportunity to network with industry peers, develop new skill sets and improve leadership capabilities. YANG events include panel discussions with industry leaders, professional development sessions and networking events throughout the country. YANG awards a number of scholarships to rising stars in the industry as well.

Upon joining, YANG members immediately become part of a 1,500-strong network of young industry professionals around the world. Members are invited to attend and host events at trade shows, leadership conferences and Regional Meet-Ups throughout the country. Members receive recognition as well as opportunities for mentorship offered by seasoned industry leaders. For your organization, membership in YANG helps foster employee retention through networking, mentorship and exposure to the broader industry.

Upcoming events

YANG Professional Series featuring Bill Hanvey

Thursday, December 1st, 2022 | 2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. ET

Join YANG for this candid conversation with Auto Care Association President & CEO, Bill Hanvey on how to accelerate your career with YANG. Unlock not just YANG’s benefits, but all of the exclusive resources available to you through the Auto Care Association.

Learn more and register

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from the yang effect

Member Spotlight: Kyle Burns and Stefan Feder

Jul 8, 2022, 11:46 AM by Jacki Lutz
If I am being honest, when I first joined YANG, I had pretty low expectations. I was excited to join a community of my peers who had similar levels of experience as I did, but as far as career growth...
Headshot_Jacki Lutz
Jacki Lutz, Sensata, Past Chair
If I am being honest, when I first joined YANG, I had pretty low expectations. I was excited to join a community of my peers who had similar levels of experience as I did, but as far as career growth and development, I had no expectations. I love that there is so much more here than that. I originally looked at this “under 40” community as limited in expertise and wisdom but what I found is a large group of industry professionals with more experience and knowledge than I could dream of this early on.

During the YANG Leadership Conference, I had the pleasure of hosting two of those YANG members on stage during the “Career Conversations” panel to talk about how they managed to reach their impressive leadership positions so early on in their careers. I spoke with Kyle Burns, vice president, distribution, Merrill Company, and Stefan Feder, head, WD channel, automotive aftermarket, ContiTech Power Transmission Group. Listed below are some of the main findings from that conversation in a nutshell.

Jacki Stefan Kyle (1)
On advice they would give themselves early on in their careers:

  • Make sure your management knows your career goals, however far away or far-fetched they may seem.
  • Be visibly committed to the success of your company.
  • Work hard and let management know that you are open to new challenges.
  • Participate in projects and take the lead when the opportunity arises.
  • If your supervisor shows faith in you, take the challenge. Regardless of how confident you are in that particular area.
On the most important soft skills of a leader:

  • Being a good listener. People want to feel like they have a voice. Care for your people and take interest in their professional and personal lives.
  • Always act in the best interest of your people.
  • Support them actively and visibly.
  • Stay humble. You don’t have all of the answers. You are not the smartest person in the room, and you don’t want to be.
On regretting early career decisions:

  • Every decision you take can be a positive or a negative, keep it positive.
  • Mistakes force you to learn and grow. If you visibly learn from them, you establish more trust. Mistakes are important for your career development.
  • Look at what you are going to do next, not what you should have done differently. It is already done, so move on and work from where you are now.
On key takeaways:

  • Show up, work hard, say “yes” to new opportunities.
  • Become visible to your manager by being open and transparent at all times.
  • Know what you want for yourself and share it with people who can get you there.


What Members Are Saying